Tilty

This stream/river used to feed the Tilty Mill which, whilst derelict, can still be found a little way down stream. The water is diverted away from the mill now. Lots more after the break. 

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A quick run out to Tilty this afternoon bagged this bluebells shot, along with some (far away) deer sightings. The waterfall shot I wanted to take was impossible due to a fallen tree…which I thought was a reasonable excuse to move on…

Here are a couple of the deer shots…

Deer Crossing

Deer and Woods, Tilty


The watermill is thought to date from the later part of the 18th century. The mill contains a large cast iron waterwheel and a complete set of gearing to three pairs of millstones. As recently as 2005 restoration was being considered, however the mill appears to have been abandoned now and is rapidly falling into disrepair.


Back to Tilty…

If you walk past the Church, down across the field past the remains of the monastery you’ll come to a derelict water mill. Walk to the back of this and you’ll be able to see the old water course that used to feed this. What remains of the river that once flowed down this wide channel can be seen below. It’s really no wonder the water mill is no longer operational and you do wonder what happened to the old river.


The second entry on this blog was about Tilty Church, and promised a series of images, this so far has not materialised! So, without further ado:

The first thing you see as you enter Tilty Church is the Font. This was made from excavated material from the Abbey dating from the 12th and 13th century. The Font cover was made much more recently.

Tilty Font Cover


Tilty Church was originally a chapel to the Cistercian Abbey of Tilty, ruins of which can still be seen a short way from the Church. The Chapel was outside the Abbey which meant it could be used by local people, including women who were not allowed within the precincts of a Cistercian Abbey. The oldest part of the Church (the nave) dates from around 1220 with the Porch and bell turret being erected in the 18th Century to complete the Church as it stands today.

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